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Thursday, 23 February 2017

James Reyne - 1994 - The Whiff of Bedlam FLAC


Who the Hell Do You Think You Are/Red Light Avenue/Lion in the Winter/Uptown Ruler/Goin' Fishin'/It's Only Natural/Winds of Change/Only a Fool Would Say That/Walking in the Dreamtime/Poor Man in the Penthouse/No Secrets



 The Whiff of Bedlam is the fourth solo studio album by Australian singer/songwriter James Reyne released in October 1994 and peaked at number 20 in Australia. The album was preceded by lead single "Red Light Avenue" in September 1994. It was his first album released under label rooArt.


Tomas Mureika of All Music said "An astonishingly mature album by any artist's rights, The Whiff of Bedlam delves into territory many would never even dare to approach, all the while remaining cloaked in some of the most gorgeous melodies Reyne has ever crafted. The opening "Who The Hell Do You Think You Are?" sets the agenda - from a wispy electric piano intro, Reyne launches into an enigmatically vicious attack against someone, yet does so simply through the dynamics of his voice, avoiding the high-pitched intensity that earmarked his earlier works. From then on, there are twelve achingly soulful confessionals through which Reyne seems constantly on the verge of tears.. The devastating "It's Only Natural" moves from an organ intro through irresistable [sic] hook after hook, as Reyne seems to resign himself to his new discoveries as he has aged, only to immediately counter the downfall with the more upbeat melancholy of "Winds Of Change". With the harrowing possibilities unleashed by The Whiff of Bedlam, it is certain to say that Reyne has found his own day in the sun... and it keeps getting gloriously darker."






Tuesday, 21 February 2017

Marc Hunter - 1994 - Talk To Strangers FLAC


Get So Rough/One Of The Good Guys/Song Of New Devotion/Spellbound/Never Give Up/Southern Cross/Ever Since You've Gone/Never Be The Same/Talk To Strangers/Desires Of The Heart



 Marc Alexander Hunter (7 September 1953 – 17 July 1998) was a New Zealand rock and pop singer, song writer and record producer. He was the lead vocalist of Dragon (1973–79, 1982–89, 1995–97), a band formed by his older brother, Todd Hunter, in Auckland in 1972. They relocated to Sydney in May 1975. He was also a member of the Party Boys (1985). For his solo career he issued five studio albums, Fiji Bitter (November 1979), Big City Talk (August 1981), Communication (September 1985), Night and Day (August 1990) and Talk to Strangers (late 1994). During the 1970s Hunter had developed heroin and alcohol addictions; he was recklessly outspoken and volatile on-stage: in November 1978 during the band's United States tour, supporting Johnny Winter, they performed in Dallas, Texas, where "he made some general stage observations about redneck buddies, illegal oral sex and pick-up trucks" and called the audience members, "faggots". Upon return to Australia, in February 1979, he was fired from the group by his brother, Todd.

In August 1982 Hunter returned to the line-up of Dragon and continued with the group while also maintaining his solo career. They disbanded in 1997 when he was diagnosed with throat cancer, he died on 17 July 1998. Benefit concerts were held to provide for his widow, Wendy Hunter, and children. On 1 July 2008, the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) inducted Dragon into their Hall of Fame. His biography, Chasing the Dragon: the Life and Death of Marc Hunter, was published by Jeff Apter in October 2011.

Thursday, 16 February 2017

Glenn Cardier - 1989 - An Everyday Maniac FLAC


Lovers Alias Fools/The Darlings of Market Street/Anniversary/New Born Babe/Ulysses/Tin Minstrel/Every Wounded Bird/I am the Day/Cars/
 Dance Numbers/Butterfly Net/The Iridescent Pink Sock Blues/Oh Dear St Peter/Christopher Columbus/Love at First Sight/Please Don't Eat the Flowers Dear/The Same Old Story/ I Saved Annette From Drowning/I See A Comedy/ Spaghetti Western (Live)


 Sydney singer/songwriter Glenn Cardier was a popular solo performer on the early 1970s scene. In much the same vein as James Taylor, Doug Ashdown and Ross Ryan, Cardier played a brand of gentle and reflective acoustic folk and soft rock that gained him a strong cult following. Cardier actually started out playing lead guitar in Brisbane acid-rock band The Revolution before taking to the road as a folkie.

He signed to Festival's progressive Infinity label, with which he issued two albums and four singles: `Every Wounded Bird'/`The Juggler' (July 1972), `Ulysses'/`Minstrel' (February 1973), `Oh Dear Saint Peter'/`I Am the Day' (July 1973) and `I See a Comedy'/`Lovers Alias Fools' (June 1974). Never content to be seen as just a sensitive folkie, Cardier toured with rock bands like La De Das, Country Radio, Sherbet and Daddy Cool. He also made an appearance at the 1972 Sunbury Festival, and supported overseas visitors Frank Zappa and Manfred Mann's Earth Band.



In 1974, Cardier became one of the first musicians in Australia (along with Rob MacKenzie from MacKenzie Theory and Greg Quill from Country Radio) to receive a travel grant from the Australia Council for the Arts (under the auspices of Gough Whitlam's Labor government). He travelled to England where he toured for several years, recording the Glenn Cardier album and a single `Till the Fire Dies'/`Christopher Columbus' (June 1976) for Interfusion along the way.

On his return to Australia in late 1978, Cardier recorded `Establishment Blues' under the psuedonym of Sydney Hill. The song appeared as the B-side to the Mojo Singers' #1 hit `C'mon Aussie C'mon'. Cardier's 1979 band, the Bel-Aires, comprised Brad Alick (lead guitar), Eddie Parise (bass, who later joined Baby Animals) and Vince Crae (drums). Cardier issued the single `Expectations'/`I Saved Annette from Drowning' in February 1980. He has also recorded the Christmas track `Reindeers on the Rooftops' under the alias Riff Raff.

Wednesday, 15 February 2017

P@ul Ke!!y - 2007 - Stolen @pp!es


Feelings Of Grief/God Told Me To/Stolen Apples Taste The Sweetest/Sweetest Thing/You're 39, You're Beautiful And You're Mine/The Lion And The Lamb/Right Outta My Head/Keep On Driving/The Ballad Of Queenie And Rover/The Foggy Fields Of France/Please Leave Your Light On


Paul Maurice Kelly AO (born 13 January 1955) is an Australian rock music singer-songwriter, guitarist, and harmonica player. He has performed solo, and has led numerous groups, including the Dots, the Coloured Girls, and the Messengers. He has worked with other artists and groups, including associated projects Professor Ratbaggy and Stardust Five. Kelly's music style has ranged from bluegrass to studio-oriented dub reggae, but his core output straddles folk, rock, and country. His lyrics capture the vastness of the culture and landscape of Australia by chronicling life about him for over 30 years. David Fricke from Rolling Stone calls Kelly "one of the finest songwriters I have ever heard, Australian or otherwise." Kelly has said, "Song writing is mysterious to me. I still feel like a total beginner. I don't feel like I have got it nailed yet".

Stolen Apples is the twenty fifth album by Australian singer-songwriter Paul Kelly and was released in July 2007 on EMI Music. The album is Kelly's first solo album since Ways & Means in 2004, and features religious themes throughout. It peaked at No. 8 on the ARIA Albums Chart.

Sunday, 5 February 2017

!NXS - 1984 - Dek@dance (Cassette) FLAC


Original Sin/I Send  A Message/Burn For You/Dancing On The Jetty/Love Is (What I Say)/Jackson


Dekadance is the title of two different collections of remixes by Australian rock group INXS: a 1983 four-track 12" and cassette EP released in the United States of songs from Shabooh Shoobah; and a 1984 seven-track cassette released in Australia of songs from The Swing. The latter included a cover version of "Jackson" as a duet by INXS' Michael Hutchence with Jenny Morris, their backing singer. This compilation peaked at No. 2 on the Australian Kent Music Report Albums Chart in April 1985.

The Australian cassette version of Dekadance features remixes from The Swing, and was released in six different versions. Each had a different sleeve, one for each member of the band, which were sourced from the band photo on the cover of The Swing. In following the general theme of the release, the photos themselves were "remixed" by the use of halftone (or similar) printing. Each image wraps completely around the package and is difficult to identify unless the package is dismantled and opened flat. Instead of the usual plastic hinged case, the packaging was a cardboard box that featured a flip-top opening, similar to that of a cigarette packet. The album was also available strictly for Promo use to radio stations. The LP version omitted the Jenny Morris/INXS cover version of "Jackson". It is a highly prized collector's item, as it was for promo - hence it is very scarce nowadays & finding it on LP is indeed a needle in a haystack!

Thursday, 2 February 2017

Kate Ceberano - 2008 - So Much Beauty FLAC


Suddenly I See/Live To Tell/She Will Be Loved/Avalon/So Much Beauty/ I'll Stand By You/Chasing Cars/Stars and Satellites/Play Me/ Never Say Never/Babylon/Bridge Over Troubled Water



 So Much Beauty is a studio album by Australian recording artist, Kate Ceberano. It was released on April 26, 2008 and reached #9 on the Australian charts.
Excluding the three new tracks, "So Much Beauty", "Stars and Satellites" and "Never Say Never", the remaining 9 songs are cover versions. Ceberano co-wrote all three originals; she co-wrote "Never Say Never" with Eddie Chacon of Charles and Eddie.

Ceberano recorded it in co-producer’s Steve Scanlon’s lounge room, with the aim of keeping both herself and her band relaxed.



Spy Vs. Spy - 1989 - Trash The Planet Cassette FLAC


The Hard Times/What The Future Holds/ Take It Or Leave It/Our House/Have No Fear/Clear Skies/Trash The Planet/Hooligans/Don't Fall Asleep At The Wheel/A New Start/Oceania



 Spy vs Spy, also known as v. Spy v. Spy, The Drug Grannies and The Spies, are an Australian ska/pub rock band from Sydney formed in 1981. They became known for tackling political issues through their music, including racism, homelessness and contemporary drug culture.They were named after a comic strip, "Spy vs. Spy" in the US Mad magazine.

The band's initial line-up was the trio of Craig Bloxom on bass guitar/lead vocals, Cliff Grigg on drums/percussion and Mike Weiley on lead guitar/vocals. Spy vs Spy's early music was ska-influenced indie rock, exemplified by their debut single "Do What You Say" on the independent Green label in April 1982. They released an EP Four Fresh Lemons in August. Their music became more straightforward hard rock for their pub audiences. The band broke up in early 1983 only to reform mid-year, by which time they were using the name v. Spy v. Spy to avoid legal problems with Mad magazine. They were eventually signed to Midnight Oil's label Powderworks and managed by Oils manager, Gary Morris. Their first full-length album Harry's Reasons was released in March 1986 and produced by Leszek Karski. They switched labels to WEA and had their highest charting success in February 1987 with their single "Don't Tear It Down" on the Australian singles chart and the associated album A.O. Mod. TV. Vers. peaked at No. 12 on the Australian albums chart.


Spy vs Spy's follow-up album, Xenophobia was released in March 1988 peaked at No. 15 in Australia. It was produced by Karski and Guy Gray and released by WEA in 14 countries. Their 1989 album Trash the Planet peaked at No. 22 on the ARIA Charts. None of their subsequent releases reached the Australian Top 40. The band split and reformed a number of times but still developed a strong following in Brazil.

Party Boys - 1987 - Party Boys Cassette FLAC


Hold Your Head Up/Is This The Way To Say Goodbye/He's Gonna Step On You Again/She's A Mystery/Rising Star/Gloria/Small Talk/It Could've Been You/Gonna See My Baby Tonight/High Voltage


 The Party Boys are an Australian rock supergroup with a floating membership commencing in 1982. Created by Mondo Rock's bass guitarist, Paul Christie as a part-time venture for professional musicians with downtime from their other projects, the group had temporary members from acts such as Status Quo, The Angels, Sherbet, Skyhooks, Rose Tattoo, The Choirboys, Australian Crawl, Divinyls, Models, Dragon and Swanee plus international stars including Joe Walsh, Eric Burdon, Alan Lancaster and Graham Bonnet. In March 1983 their debut album, Live at Several 21sts, peaked at No. 9 on the Australian Kent Music Report Albums Chart. In June 1987 they had a number-one hit on the related Singles Chart with a cover version of John Kongos' hit, "He's Gonna Step On You Again". It also peaked at No. 10 on the New Zealand Singles Chart.


The Party Boys is self-titled album by Australian rock band The Party Boys. It was the band's first and only studio album. Tracks 2, 4, 5 and 8 were originals, the rest of the songs were originally recorded by (in order): Argent, John Kongos, Them, The Angels, La De Da's and AC/DC, however "It Could Have Been You" was originally released by Party Boy's lead singer John Swan as a single in 1985.

Mi-Sex - 1980 - Space Race Cassette FLAC


Space Race/Pages And Matches/Living In September/I Don't Know/Slippin' Out/ It Only Hurts When I'm Laughing/People/Good Guys Always Win (Satire)/Ghosts/ Burning Up/Ice Cold Dead


  Mi-Sex (also styled as MiSex) is a New Zealand new wave rock band that was originally active from 1977 to 1986. Led by Steve Gilpin as vocalist, Kevin Stanton as guitarist and songwriter and Don Martin as bassist. They provided top ten singles, "Computer Games" in October 1979 (No. 1 in Australia, No. 5 in New Zealand) and "People" in 1980 (No. 6 and No. 3, respectively). Their first two albums both reached the New Zealand top 10, Graffiti Crimes (July 1979) and Space Race (No. 1, June 1980). They were known for their cutting edge production and dynamic live shows. Gilpin died in January 1992, two months after a serious car accident from which he never recovered.

For their second album, Space Race (June 1980), the label provided a "massive promotional campaign for which 'Are you a clone? . . . No, I'm in the Space Race' was the slogan, and little rubber mannequins of the alien featured on the front cover popped up all over the place." Ed Nimmervoll of Howlspace website felt that the album was "talking about overpopulation, environmental issues, genetic engineering and other issues of great importance for the future."


Dawkins produced the album, recording it in January 1980. In New Zealand it peaked at No. 1 and in Australia it reached No. 6. Space Race provided another top 10 single, "People", which reached No. 3 in New Zealand and No. 6 in Australia. The title track was the next single and peaked in the top 20 in New Zealand and top 30 in Australia. Although Mi-Sex toured Australia and New Zealand through 1981 – performing 366 gigs in that year – the group "found its popularity in slow decline."

Burns told The Australian Women's Weekly's Susan Moore that "When we arrived new wave was very full-on and we had pretty much a street image. Then when we did Space Race, which we felt was an extension of what we were doing, I guess some people didn't like the idea of a concept album ... we copped a lot of flack."




Deborah Conway - 1991 - White Roses (Cassette Single) FLAC


White Roses (String Of Pearls Mix)/(You Can Put Your) Shoes Under My Bed/White Roses (Album Version)/White Roses (Instrumental)


  Deborah Ann Conway, (born 8 August 1959) is an Australian rock singer-songwriter and guitarist, and had a career as a model and actress. She was a founding member of the 1980s rock band Do-Ré-Mi with their surprise top 5 hit "Man Overboard".

Conway performs solo and has a top 20 hit single with "It's Only the Beginning" (1991). The associated album, String of Pearls, also peaked in the top 20. She won the 1992 Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) Music Award for 'Best Female Artist'. Her next album, Bitch Epic, reached the top 20 in November 1993. Conway organised and performed on the Broad Festivals from 2005 to 2008 – show-casing contemporary Australian female artists.

"White Roses" was released on the Mushroom Label in May 1992 and charted at #87 it was taken from the platinum album "String of Pearls"



Boom Crash Opera - 1987 - Boom Crash Opera (Cassette) FLAC


Gap That Opened/Hands Up In The Air/Love Me To Death/City Flat/Her Charity/Sleeping Time/Great Wall/Bombshell/Caught Between Two Towns/Too Hot To Think


Boom Crash Opera is the first album by Australian rock band Boom Crash Opera, released in 1987. Singles released from the album include two which reached the top 20 on the Australian Kent Music Report Singles Chart, "Great Wall" and "Hands Up in the Air".

In 1986 Boom Crash Opera signed with Dirty Pool Management and WEA Records. The band recorded their first two singles in 1986 with English producer Steve Brown (ABC, The Cult and Wham!) at Platinum Studios in Melbourne. Their debut single, "Great Wall", which was released in May 1986 reached No. 5 on the (Australian) national chart. Their second single, "Hands up in the Air", followed in late July, peaking at No. 16. Following which the band toured nationally with Icehouse.


 At the ARIA Music Awards of 1987 the group were nominated for three awards: Highest Selling Single for "Great Wall", Best New Talent for both singles, and Best Video for "Hands up in the Air". At the Countdown Music and Video Awards of 1986, held in July 1987, "Great Wall" won Best Debut Single.

The label then flew the band to London to record their debut album at RAK Studios with producer, Alex Sadkin (Simply Red, Grace Jones, Talking Heads) and engineer, Will Gosling (Big Country). Both "Great Wall" and "Hands up in the Air" were remixed for their album versions. After recording the album Sadkin travelled to the Bahamas to work, where he died in a car accident in July. The self-titled album was released in September 1987, reached No. 19 on the Kent Music Report Albums Chart and went on to achieve Gold record status. It spawned a further three singles, "City Flat" (June 1987), "Her Charity" (September 1987) and "Love Me to Death (March 1988).

In an interview Farnan said "The whole idea of the album was to capture a live band feel, rather than a meticulously layered, constructed studio artist sound. We just wanted to capture a fairly live feel and wanted people feeling there were musicians playing and performing, rather than, you know, machines."

Tuesday, 24 January 2017

Debbie Byrne - 1991 - Caught In The Act FLAC


Oh, What a Beautiful Mornin'/Wouldn't It Be Loverly/Every Day A Little Death/I Dreamed a Dream/Whats The Use Of Wond'rin'/Younger Than Springtime/Edelwiess/Memory/Tell Me On A Sunday/I'll Do Anything/Medley From The King And I



Debra Anne Byrne (born 30 March 1957), formerly billed as Debbie Byrne, is an Australian pop singer, actress and entertainer. From April 1971 to March 1975 she was a founding cast member of Young Talent Time. She started her solo singing career with a cover version of "He's a Rebel" (March 1974), which peaked at No. 25 on the Go-Set Australian Singles chart. At the Logie Awards of 1974 she won Best Teenage Personality and followed with the Queen of Pop Award in October – both ceremonies were sponsored by TV Week. She repeated both wins in the following year.

As an actress Byrne appeared in the Australian musical theatre versions of Cats (July 1985 to mid-1987), Les Misérables (November 1987 to May 1988, December 1989 to June 1990) and Sunset Boulevard (October 1996 to June 1997). Her solo album, Caught in the Act (April 1991), peaked at No. 2 on the ARIA Albums Chart and was certified gold. In 2006 Byrne published her autobiography, Not Quite Ripe: A Memoir.

Monday, 23 January 2017

Various - 1966 - Spinnin' High FLAC


 Tony Barber Someday/I Want Her Too/Is It Raining/You Can't Lie To A Liar    
 Steve & The Board The Giggle Eyed Goo!/Rosalyn/Margot/Rosemarie    
 Marty Rhone Nature Boy/Every Minute Of You/Thirteen Women/I Can Tell   
 Ronnie Burns True, True Lovin'/Too Many People/Very Last Day/Let It Be Me


There were a few of these 4x4's released in the sixties mostly by Festival Records a bit like having 4 EP's  on one album this one has 4 of the best Marty Rhone, Tony Barber, Ronnie Burns and Steve And The Board.




Marty Rhone was born as Karel (or Karl) Lawrence van Rhoon on 7 May 1948 in Soerabaja, Dutch East Indies (later named Surabaya, Indonesia).  The family migrated to Australia on 21 April 1950 and briefly lived in Sydney and Brisbane, and then moved to Darwin. After he finished primary school, the family moved to Sydney, where he attended Crows Nest Boys High School.  In mid-1961 he appeared on a talent quest segment of ATN7-TV series, Tarax Show, and was offered a singing spot on a children's show, Kaper Kabaret. In late 1965 he formed a band, The Blue Feelings, and they auditioned for an appearance on Saturday Date, a teen music show. After the audition Spin Records owner, Nat Kipner, signed Rhone to a recording contract and the label issued his debut single, "Nature Boy", in February the following year. For his next two singles, "Thirteen Women" (April) and "I Want You Back Again", Rhone was backed by Spin Records label mates, The Soul Agents, a beat pop group. They had formed in 1964 and by 1966 consisted of Jerry Darmic on bass guitar, Roger Felice-Andrews on drums, John Green on guitar and Barry Kelly on organ.


Rhone's fourth single, "She Is Mine", included the self-penned B-side, "Village Tapestry", which appeared in September. None of these singles charted on the Go-Set National Top 40, however Australian musicologist, Ian McFarlane, described "Village Tapestry" as being "highly regarded among 1960s aficionados". In Iain McIntyre's book, Tomorrow Is Today: Australia in the Psychedelic Era, 1966-1970 (2006), the track was listed by Ian D. Marks as one of the 'Top 7 Proto-Psychedelic Australian Tracks from 1966'. Marks described it as "completely out of left field. With a gentle, almost medieval lilt, autoharps a-strumming and a charming spoken word verse—there was nothing like this released in Australia at the time. Melodic, evocative and delicate". During 1966 Marty Rhone and The Soul Agents supported The Rolling Stones on the United Kingdom rock group's tour of Australia. They also performed on the bill of the P.J. Proby Show at the Sydney Stadium with Wayne Fontana, Eden Kane and The Bee Gees appearing. Marty would go on to have more success in the 70's.


Ronald "Ronnie" Leslie Burns AM (born 8 September 1946) is an Australian rock singer and guitarist. He fronted the Melbourne band The Flies in the early 1960s.
As a solo artist, Burns became one of Australia's most popular male pop singers from the mid-1960s to the early 1970s. His first single, "Very Last Day" was released in June 1966 on Spin Records and peaked at No. 12 on Melbourne's Top 40 singles chart. His second single, "True True Lovin" followed in August and reached No. 15. Go-Set published their inaugural pop poll on 5 October, Normie Rowe won 'Australian Male Vocal' of the year – he was later called 'King of Pop' – with Burns second and Johnny Young third. Also in October, Go-Set published Australia's first National Top 40 singles chart, Burns' third single, "Coalman", which was released in January 1967, peaked at No. 6. Another Top 20 single was "Exit, Stage Right" in June. In August, Burns topped the Go-Set pop poll for 'Top Male Singer' and ABC-TV broadcast a documentary, The Life of Ronnie Burns. Over the next four years, he consistently finished third on the Go-Set pop poll.


 Burns had several minor national hits – "We Had a Good Thing Going" (October 1967), "When I Was Six Years Old" (March 1968), written for him by Brian Cadd and Max Ross of The Groop, and "Age of Consent" (January 1969), written by Terry Britten of The Twilights. Most of Burns' 1967 material was written by The Bee Gees, the tracks appeared on his first solo album Ronnie (Spin, July 1967). "Smiley", Burns' biggest hit, reached number two on the Go-Set National Top 40 in February 1970. It was also written by Young, Young revealed that the song was inspired by the experiences of fellow pop star, Rowe, whose music career ended in late 1967 when he was drafted into the Australian Army and he was sent to fight in the Vietnam War. It is one of the first Australian pop singles released in stereo and features a lavish orchestral and vocal arrangement by John Farrar (ex The Strangers) who went on to write and/or produce many hits for Olivia Newton-John.

In the early 1970s, Burns had moved from pop to more adult contemporary music, he toured the club and cabaret circuit. Further Young-penned singles were "The Prophet" in January 1971 and "If I Die" in 1972. He appeared on variety TV shows including as a judge on Young Talent Time, where Maggie Burns was a choreographer. Burns' last single, "Brand New Number One" was released in 1980 on the Fable Records label.


In the short time they were around, Steve & The Board supplied listeners with a menu of sublime and snotty garage-punk songs and a wild stage presence. Formed in late '65, the group was unusually one of the very few young Australian beat units to be allowed the indulgence of an album without a string of chart hits behind them. This situation may be attributable to the fact that Steve's dad just happened to be the boss of Spin Records -- producer, songwriter and entrepreneur Nat Kipner, who had previously been one of the partners in Ivan Dayman's Sunshine label.

Nat had formed a close relationship with The Bee Gees. In 1966 he saved them from being dropped from the Leedon label by Festival Records, persuading the company to transfer them to the Spin label and co-produced most of their last Australian recordings with Ozzie Byrne at his St Clair studio in Hurstville. Through his father, Steve Kipner and the band became good mates with the Gibb brothers. Colin Petersen drummed on many of the Bee Gees Spin recording in 1966, and Carl Keats is also probably the only person to have ever written a song specifically for the Bee Gees -- "Lonely Winter" (1966). Steve & The Board returned the favour by covering Barry's "Little Miss Rhythm & Blues" on their Giggle Eyed Goo LP. The album was recorded at the end of 1966 with Colin Petersen, but he quit immediately after the sessions and head to the UK soon after.



 A particularly interesting piece of Steve & The Board trivia is that Brisbane-born drummer Colin Peterson was a noted child actor. Colin will be known to generations of Australians for his portrayal of the irrepressible young larrikin Smiley in the classic 1950s Australian film of that name, and he also appeared in The Scamp and A Cry in the Streets.

Nat Kipner penned the band's first single, the rude and raucous "Giggle Eyed Goo", which cheekily copped a line in the bridge from a contemporaneous toilet-paper commercial jingle -- "It's pink and blue and primrose too". This remarkable piece of ratbag punk-rock became a sizable hit in Eastern states in '66, and was followed up by a great rocking track with possibly one of the corniest garage rock titles ever: "I Call My Woman Hinges ('Cos She's Something To Adore)".

Colin Petersen's replacement was Geoff Bridgford, a solid player who went on to join Melbourne soul stylists The Groove. Geoff played on Steve and The Board's final single, "Sally Was a Good Old Girl"/ "Good for Nothing Sue" (January 1967), but the group broke up soon afterwards, in May 1967.



Guitarist, singer, songwriter and author Tony Barber is one of the unsing heroes of the Beat Boom in Australia. Rock historian Dean Mittelhauser considered him "one of our most underrated performers from the Sixties" and felt that Tony had "played a bigger part in the success of Billy Thorpe & The Aztecs that has been generally credited".

Tony was one of the many music-crazy young migrants who arrived in Australia in the late 1950s and early 1960s, and he had played in a minor band called The Electrons before leaving the UK. Within weeks of his arrival in Australia in 1964 he met a cocky young singer called Billy Thorpe in Kings Cross and he was immediately drafted in as the fifth member of Billy's backing band, The Aztecs. Tony was already developing into a competent pop writer and he composed both sides of the Aztec's first single "Blue Day" / You don't love me", released on the Linda Lee label in April 1964.

Two days before The Aztecs' next recording session, Tony received a 'care package' from his brother in the UK that contained the Rolling Stones' first EP. Afer hearing The Stones' version of Lieber & Stoller's "Poison Ivy", Tthe Aztecs decided to record the song on their next single. It's now a matter of history that their version (widely regarded as being superior to The Stones') shot to #1, became one of the biggest Australian pop hits of the year, kept The Beatles out of the top spot in the Sydney charts in the very midst of their tour, and made Billy and The Aztecs into national stars. Tony featured on the next three Aztecs singles, "Mashed Potato" "Sick and Tired" and "Over The rainbow" -- all of which were major hits -- but in late 1965 Tony and the rest of The Aztecs quit en masse, mainly because of ongoing financial wrangles with manager John Harrigan.
After leaving The Aztecs, Tony and fellow Aztec Vince Maloney formed the shortlived Vince & Tony's Two, with John Shields on bass and Jimmy Thompson on drums. In late 1965 Tony was signed as a solo artist to the newly formed Everybody's label, which had been established by Clyde Packer's Consolidated Press. Tony's solo debut single (produced by Nat Kipner) was a thumping beat original called "Someday", which it was one of the first (and only) four singles issued on Everybody's. None of these singles -- including Tony's -- was unsuccessful on first release because of resistance from radio DJs who (not unreasonably) regarded the label as blatant cross-promotion for Packer's Everybody's magazine and refused to name it on air.


 The label was hastily rebadged as Spin Records and Tony's single was re-issued in February 1966. This time it took off, becoming a major hit that peaked at #7 in Sydney and #11 in Melbourne. Tony released four more singles on Spin -- "Wait By The Water" (Apr. 1966), "Wondrous Place" (July '66), "Lookin' for a better day" (Jan. 1967) and "Bird's Eye View", which was written for a long-forgotten TV documentary. Tony was also granted the rare privilege of recording an entire LP, entitled Someday ... Now!, on which he was backed by labelmates Steve & The Board and The Bee Gees.

Although he was signed to Spin as a recording artist, Tony also worked with another independent label during this period, the Melbourne-based Phono Vox. He produced several singles by Phon Vox artists, including Denise Drysdale and The Bentbeaks, and he also wrote the A-side of Denise's single "Sunshine Shadow". In late 1967, after his Spin contract had ended, Tony released one single under his own name on Phono Vox, but this proved to be his swansong as a recording artist. During 1967 Tony married his girlfriend Sue Peck, a staffer with Go-Set magazine, and soon after he left the pop scene to concentrate on business ventures and raising a family. In the 1980s he reunited with his old friend Billy Thorpe in the successful 'Sunshine Friends' soft toy enterprise.

In 2002, after more than thirty years away from the limelight, Tony reunited with Billy and the original Aztecs for the historic Long Way To The Top concert tours. His experiences inspired him to write a memoir of the tour and his early days as a pop musician, entitled Long Way Til You Drop. Regrettably, there was opposition to the book from some of those involved in the LWTTT tour, fuelled by pre-publication media hype that suggested it would be a tell-all exposé. In the event, Tony's book proved to be an entertaining, witty and affectionate account of an important chapter in Australian rock history.

Thursday, 19 January 2017

Various - 2000 - Sixties Downunder Vol. 4 FLAC


DINAH LEE - Don’t you know Yokomo
MERV BENTON & THE TAMLAS - Yield not to temptation
M.P.D. LIMITED - Lonely boy
GRANTLEY DEE - Let the little girl dance
BILLY THORPE & THE AZTECS - Over the rainbow
BEV HARRELL - What am I doing here with you?
JOHNNY YOUNG & KOMPANY - Step back
THE EASYBEATS - Come & see her
BOBBY & LAURIE - Hitchhiker
GLEN INGRAM & THE HI FIVE - Skye boat song
NORMIE ROWE - Ooh la la
THE EXECUTIVES - My aim is to please you
THE CHEROKEES - Minnie the moocher
LOVED ONES - Sad dark eyes
THE GROOVE - Simon says
THE IGUANA - California, my way
THE VIRGIL BROTHERS - Temptation’s ‘bout to get me
PASTORAL SYMPHONY - Love machine
THE STRANGERS - Happy without you
RONNIE BURNS - Age of consent
ZOOT - 1x2x3x4
NEW DREAM - Groupie
THE FLYING CIRCUS - Hayride
RUSSELL MORRIS - The girl that I love
RONNIE CHARLES - Katy Jane
THE EASYBEATS - St. Louis
AXIOM - Arkansas Grass
KING FOX - Unforgotten dreams

Various - 1998 - Sixties Downunder Vol. 3 FLAC


 EASYBEATS- She’s so fine
BOBBY & LAURIE- Someone
PETER DOYLE & THE PHANTOMS- Stupidity
M.P.D. LIMITED- Little boy sad
THE CICADAS- That’s what I want
THE CHANGING TIMES- Mary Lou
BOBBY & LAURIE- Judy Green
THE EASYBEATS- Wedding ring
NORMIE ROWE- The breaking point
RAY BROWN & THE WHISPERS- Ain’t it strange
ALLUSIONS- Gypsy woman
PURPLE HEARTS- I’m gonna try
THE THROB- Black
THE RUNNING JUMPING STANDING STILL- Diddy wah diddy
PHIL JONES & THE UNKNOWN BLUES- If I had a ticket
LA DE DAS- Hey baby
THE TWILIGHTS- What’s wrong with the way I live
LARRY’S REBELS- Painter man
THE WILD CHERRIES- Krome plated yabby
JAMES TAYLOR MOVE- Magic eyes
THE PLAYBOYS- Sad
PROCESSION- Listen
SOMEBODY'S IMAGE- Hide & seek
TERRY BRITTEN- 2,000 weeks
DOUG PARKINSON IN FOCUS- Dear Prudence
THE MASTER’S APPRENTICES- 5.10 man
THE DAVE MILLER SET- Mr. Guy Fawkes
RUSSELL MORRIS- The Real Thing

Various - 1990 - Sixties Downunder Vol. 2 FLAC


NORMIE ROWE & PLAYBOYS- Shakin' all over
TONY BARBER- Someday
MIKE FURBER & BOWERY BOYS- Just a poor boy
NORMIE ROWE & PLAYBOYS- Que sera sera
RAY BROWN & THE WHISPERS- Fool fool fool
RAY COLUMBUS & THE INVADERS- She's a mod
BILLY THORPE & THE AZTECS- Sick & tired
THE TWILIGHTS- Bad boy
THE ALLUSIONS- The dancer
JOHNNY YOUNG & KOMPANY- Caralyn
RONNIE BURNS- Coalman
LYNNE RANDELL- I'll come running over
NORMIE ROWE & PLAYBOYS- Tell him I'm not home
THE THROB- Fortune teller
THE EASYBEATS- I'll make you happy
RONNIE BURNS- Exit stage right
THE PURPLE HEARTS- Early in the morning
THE LOVED ONES- The loved one
MASTER'S APPRENTICES- Undecided
THE GROOP- Sorry
THE VIBRANTS- Something about you
JEFF ST. JOHN & THE ID- Big time operator
RAY HOFF & THE OFFBEATS- Tossin' & turnin'
MAX MERRITT & THE METEORS- Shake
PYTHON LEE JACKSON- Um um um um
THE EASYBEATS- Friday on my mind
MASTER'S APPRENTICES- Elevator driver
TWILIGHTS- Cathy come home
THE GROOP- Such a lovely way

Monday, 16 January 2017

Various - 1988 - Sixties Downunder FLAC


BILLY THORPE & THE AZTECS - Poison Ivy
BOBBY & LAURIE - I belong with you
NORMIE ROWE & THE PLAYBOYS - It ain't necessarily so
RAY BROWN & THE WHISPERERS - Pride
MIKE FURBER & THE BOWERY BOYS - You stole my love
TONY WORSLEY - Just a little bit
PINK FINKS - Louie Louie
EASYBEATS - Sorry
TWILIGHTS - Needle in a haystack
STEVE & THE BOARD - Giggle eyed goo
LIBRETTOS - Kicks
PURPLE HEARTS - Of hopes & dreams & tombstones
MASTERS' APPRENTICES - Buried & dead
BLACK DIAMONDS - I want, need, love you
EASYBEATS - Women
MAX MERRITT & METEORS - Fannie Mae
BEE GEES - Spicks & specks
THE GROOP - Woman you're breaking me
LOVED ONES - Everlovin' man
THE WILD CHERRIES - That's life
TWILIGHTS - 9.50
MASTERS' APPRENTICES - Living in a child's dream
THE GROOVE - Soothe me
NORMIE ROWE - It's not easy
THE TOWN CRIERS - Everlasting love
LYNNE RANDELL - Ciao baby
SOMEBODY'S IMAGE - Hush



 The first disc in this superlative and very popular series came out in 1988. Sixities Downunder was also the first release in the new CD format from renowned reissue specialists Raven Records, who had already made their name with classic compilations of The Masters Apprentices and The Twilights. Compiled and annotated by Oz rock guru Glenn A. Baker, they are as near to a definitive collection of '60s Australia pop as we're ever likely to get. Now into its fourth volume, this is a true musical feast, and the most remarkable thing is that there's barely a dud amongst its 112 tracks.

Raven have taken 1964 as their starting point, and Volume 1 kicks off in appropriate fashion with Thorpie's epoch-making Poison Ivy, the song that marked the start of the Beat Boom in Australia, and it's uphill all the way from there. Every track on this first disc is a gold-plated classic, and Disc One alone must rate as perhaps the best sampler of Australian '60s pop every released. It shares a number of tracks in common with the excellent Festival compilation So You Wanna Be A Rock'n'Roll Star?, but that set necessarily featured only Festival (or Festival distributed) artists and focused primarily on NSW acts. The Sixties Downunder series covers the whole gamut of Australian pop, with tracks from every major label (and a few minor ones!), every major city, and virtually every important act of the period.





Friday, 13 January 2017

Johnny Young - 1988 - Step Back FLAC


Step Back/Cara-Lyn/Kiss Me Now/When Will I Be Loved/Lady/Good Evening Girl/Mrs. Willoughby/Mrs. Willoughby/Let It Be Me/All My Lovin'/Every Christian Lion Hearted Man Will Show You/Craise Finton Kirk/ I Am The World/After Dark/Epitath To Mr.Simon, Sir/Unconscientious Objector/This Is My World/Mr. Reagan 43/Willy Nilly/Devoted To You




Johnny Young (born Johnny Benjamin de Jong, 12 March 1947) is a Dutch Australian singer, composer, record producer, disc jockey, television producer and host. Originally from Netherlands, his family settled in Perth, Western Australia in the early 1950s. Young had a career in the 1960s as a pop singer and had a number one hit with the double-A-side, "Step Back" and "Cara-lyn" in 1966. As a composer, he penned number one hits, "The Real Thing" and "The Girl That I Love" for Russell Morris, "The Star" for Ross D. Wylie and "I Thank You" for Lionel Rose. He presented and produced the popular television show, Young Talent Time, which screened on Network Ten from 1971 to 1988 – it launched the careers of teen pop stars Jamie Redfern, Debra Byrne, Dannii Minogue and Tina Arena – typically each episode closed with a sing-along rendition of The Beatles song "All My Loving".
On 9 March 1990, Young was inducted into the TV Week Logie Awards' Hall of Fame. On 27 October 2010, he was inducted into the Australian Recording Industry Association (ARIA) Hall of Fame by Tina Arena who performed his song, "The Star". He is the first, and so far only, person to be inducted in both halls.

Pseudo Echo - 1989 - Race FLAC


Fooled Again/Over Tomorrow/Caught/Imagination/Don't You Forget/Runaways/Searching For A Glory/Take On The World/Metropolis/Eye Of The Storm



 Pseudo Echo are an Australian new wave band that formed in 1982 in Melbourne. The original line-up consisted of Brian Canham (vocals, guitars and keyboards), born 3 July 1962, Pierre Gigliotti (as Pierre Pierre) (bass guitar, keyboards), Tony Lugton (guitars and keyboards) and Anthony Argiro (drums). A later line-up included James Leigh (keyboards) and his brother, Vince Leigh (drums). In the 1980s, Pseudo Echo had Australian top 20 hits with "Listening", "A Beat for You", "Don't Go", "Love an Adventure", "Living in a Dream" and their cover of "Funky Town" (from Lipps Inc.), which peaked at No. 1 in 1986. In 1987, it reached No. 1 in Canada and New Zealand, No. 6 in United States and No. 8 in United Kingdom.




 They released their debut album, Autumnal Park in 1984 which peaked at No. 11 on the Australian Kent Music Report. Love an Adventure followed in 1985 and reached No. 14. Their third album, Race (1989) peaked at No. 18 and in 1990 the group disbanded. They reformed in 1998 and issued Teleporter in 2000. Rock music historian Ian McFarlane, stated they "combined flash clothes, blow-wave hairstyles, youthful exuberance and accessible synth-pop to arrive at a winning combination ... and found a ready-made audience among teenagers who fawned on the band's every move".








Race is the third studio album released by Australian new wave band, Pseudo Echo. It was released via EMI Australia in 1988 and RCA Records internationally in 1989. Race resulted in a musical change for the group as it mirrored the music landscape at the time; dominated by big hair, big guitars and rock. While the album no doubt alienated the majority of the bands fan base, it equally attracted a new breed of rock loving fans. The album included their track "Take On the World" which won at 1987 World Popular Song Festival (aka Yamaha Music Festival) in Japan. Three singles were released from the album, the first "Fooled Again" (which had "Take On The World" as a B-side) peaked at No.32 in Australia in late 1988





Tuesday, 10 January 2017

Sherbet - 1976 - Howzat! FLAC


Howzat!/Lady Of The Night/Gimme' Love/If I Had My Way/Hollywood Dreaming/Dancer/Blueswalkin'/Motor Of Love/The Swap (You Can Get The Lot)/Can't Find True Love/I'll Be Coming Home



Howzat is an album by the Australian band Sherbet released in 1976. It spent two weeks at number one on the Australian albums chart in 1976.

The title track was also a number one hit and remains the group's biggest hit, especially outside of Australia, reaching the top 5 of the UK charts and also entering the US Billboard Hot 100 chart. It is often used as a cricket anthem and is sometimes loudly played by ground organisers at limited-overs matches. "Howzat" is a catchcry used by cricketers when appealing to the umpire for a wicket. It was featured on the soundtrack of the New Zealand-made film In My Father's Den, and later covered by the Wellington International Ukulele Orchestra.