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Thursday, 16 November 2017

Doug Parkinson - 1973 - No Regrets FLAC


A1 Takin' It Easy
A2 Tell Him I'll Be All Right 
A3 I Ain't Gonna Live That Way No More 
A4 And Things Unsaid 
A5 No Regrets 
B1 Sweet Rock and Roll 
B2 Lonely 
B3 Get What You Can 
B4 Light My Fire 
B5 Dear Prudence 
B6 Love Gun  








In 1973 Doug gathered an all-star session band to record his first solo LP, the aptly-titled No Regrets, released in May on Polydor. The studio line-up was led by keyboard player John Capek (piano; ex-Carson) with Graham Morgan, Peter Figures and Russell Dunlop (drums), Tim Partridge (bass), guitarists Kevin Borich, Billy Green, Ross East and Jimmy Doyle, Roger Sellers (percussion), Don Reid (flute, sax) and Terry Hannagan (vocals). Capek co-wrote five tracks, two with Doug himself and three with Terry Hannagan; Doug contributed his first solo composition, the opening track, And Things Unsaid, and the album also featured a new version of "Dear Prudence", plus Ray Burton's "Love Gun", Kevin Borich's "Sweet Rock & Roll" and a cover of The Doors' "Light My Fire". The album was re-released in 1980 as part of Polydor's budget priced ‘Rock Legends' series.

Thursday, 9 November 2017

Rockmelons - 1992 - Form One Planet FLAC






01 That Word (L.O.V.E)
02 Stronger Together
03 Form One Planet
04 It's Not Over
05 Love's Gonna Bring You Home
06 Rain
07 More Tales of the City
08 Dance Floor
09 Ain't No Sunshine
10 Bubble and Squeak 





 Rockmelons, often referred to as the Rockies, are an Australian Pop/Dance/R&B group formed in 1983 in Sydney. Primary members are Bryon Jones, his brother Jonathon Jones and Raymond Medhurst. They had two Australian top five hit singles in the early 1990s with "Ain't No Sunshine" and "That Word (L.O.V.E.)", both sung by Deni Hines. The associated album, Form 1 Planet, peaked at #3 on the ARIA albums chart in 1992, and was certified platinum in Australia.



The group concept was formed in 1983 at a warehouse party in Sydney when Raymond Medhurst (keyboards) wanted a band to perform for a private party. He contacted the Jones brothers Bryon (keyboards, bass guitar, backing vocals) and Jonathon (keyboards, guitar, drums) (both ex-Les Ukuleles, No Heavy Lifting), they asked Medhurst's schoolmate, Vincent Dale (keyboards) (ex-Ish with Bryon Jones) to join.


In 1991, Rockmelons recruited vocalist Deni Hines and recorded their cover of Bill Withers' "Ain't No Sunshine" which reached #5 in Australia in January 1992, and was certified gold. Their follow-up single "That Word (L.O.V.E.)" (written by B. Jones, J. Jones, Medhurst and Robin Smith) reached #4 in Australia, and was also certified gold.[4] By 1992, Doug Williams had joined as a vocalist whilst Hines left to have success as a solo artist, with the "It's Alright" single (1995) peaking at #4 in Australia. Rockmelons were nominated for ARIA Album of the Year award in 1993 for Form 1 Planet, which peaked at #3 in Australia in August 1992 and was certified platinum by ARIA.

Monday, 6 November 2017

John Rowles - 1992 - 14 Classic Hits FLAC


1.Smoke gets in your eyes
2.Lonely is the night
3.Ain't no mountain high enough
4.When a man loves a woman
5.Hey
6.Everything I do (I do it for you)
7.MacArthur Park
8.Mustang Sally
9. Soul Medely
Hard to handle, Higher and higher, Sweet soul music, Midnight hour
10.Don't let the sun go down on me
11.River deep mountain high
12.The sun ain't gonna shine anymore
13.I want to know what love is
14.Sexual healing



  John Edward Rowles OBE (born 26 March 1947) is a New Zealand singer. He was most popular in the late 1960s, 1970s and early 1980s, and he was best known in New Zealand for his song from 1970, "Cheryl Moana Marie", which he had written about his younger sister.

Rowles was born in Whakatane, New Zealand, and is part Māori. His father, Eddie Hohapata Rowles, played for the 1938 Māori All Blacks. His mother was white. He was brought up in Kawerau, in the North Island of New Zealand. Rowles' birth name was simply John Rowles; he added the middle name "Edward" after his brother of that name died at a young age.

Rowles is best known in New Zealand and Australia, though he has also performed in the United States, particularly Las Vegas, Nevada and Hawaii, where he was managed by Kimo Wilder McVay. In the United Kingdom he was best known for the hit, "If I Only Had Time", which reached number 3 in the UK Singles Chart in spring 1968, and stayed in the chart for eighteen weeks. This was a cover version of the French song "Je n'aurai pas le temps" with which the French singer Michel Fugain had a hit in 1967. The song also charted big in the Netherlands, reaching #2, after which the Franck Pourcel Orchestra had a minor hit with an instrumental version of the song, bearing the original French song title. In the US Nick DeCaro and his orchestra charted with his instrumental version, released as the B-side of the single Caroline, No in late 1968, peaking at #71 in the Cash Box Top 100 in early 1969.

 Rowles had another Top 20 hit in the UK with "Hush Not a Word to Mary", also in 1968. This song also charted in the Netherlands. In the USA "Cheryl Moana Marie" got noticed in the summer of 1970 by some West Coast radio stations, but it lasted until the end of 1970 for the song to chart nationally, peaking at #64 in the Billboard Hot 100 and #78 in the Cash Box Top 100 resp. in early 1971.
In 1974 Rowles received the Benny Award from the Variety Artists Club of New Zealand Inc, the highest honour available to a New Zealand variety entertainer.




Sunday, 29 October 2017

Jeff St. John's Copperwine - 1970 - Joint Effort FLAC


Cloud Nine/Sing A Simple Song/Fanciful Flights/Any Orange Night/You Don't Have To Listen/I Been Treated Wrong/Days To Come/Reach Out/Can't Find My Way Home/Train/I Remember/Environment In 3 Parts/Teach Me How To Fly/Freedom Blues/Hummingbird/Keep On Growing



Jeff St. John was born Jeffrey Leo Newton in 1946 with Spina Bifida which, by his mid twenties eventually resulted in the need for a wheelchair.

Aged just 8, Jeff's first public performance was a kids' talent quest on Sydney's radio 2GB. Then at 15, his singing career took off with a role as a regular feature vocalist on Channel 9's teenage variety program "Opportunity Knocks", hosted by Desmond Tester. He appeared regularly on the show between 1961 and 1963. 

 A couple of years afterwards, by this time almost constantly supported by crutches because of his worsening condition, Jeff joined forces with an established Sydney blues-rock band called The Syndicate who he met by chance at the Sydney Musicians Club in early 1965 this later was merged into the band Wild Oats.

Later, in 1965, he joined The Id (named after the popular Johnny Hart cartoon strip The Wizard of Id), it was then Jeff started using the new stage name Jeff St. John, which he has used ever since.

This powerhouse band quickly became a leading attraction in Sydney with a long-term residency at the Here Disco in North Sydney, and also made their mark on the Melbourne scene, playing at the famous Thumpin' Tum with its powerful, brass-augmented repertoire and Jeff's rich and soulful vocals.

Jeff St John & the Id's reputation as one of the country's top R&B bands also earned them a well-received support gig on the 1967 Yardbirds, Roy Orbison and Walker Brothers tour of Australia.

In 1965, their debut single "Lindy Lou", was a pleasant R&B number which gave only a sight hint of the vocal prowess that Jeff would unleash on later releases. It was followed in 1966 by "The Jerk". Later that year they released "Black Girl".


Jeff and the Id are probably most remembered for their scorching, brass-laden smash single, "Big Time Operator", which featured Aussie sax legend Bob Birtles. "Big Time Operator" reached number 7 in Sydney and a respectable number 12 in Melbourne in January 1967, and the recording sessions at Festival Records in Sydney were even photographed for a special feature in Australian music magazine Go-Set. Then, out of the blue, Jeff parted ways with The Id.


 Jeff meanwhile put together Yama. The lineup again featured musicians from other successful bands of the time. Bass player Virgil East from from Python Lee Jackson, drummer Peter Figures from Throb, along with Ross East on guitar, who would continue to work with Jeff for some time thereafter. Yama folded prematurely around May 1968 after releasing one single, "Nothing Comes Easy".

Yama folded in 1968 because his pressure area became unmanageable and he came back to Sydney Hospital to try and fix the problem. After a wasted three months of unsuccessful skin grafts and over - hearing the head of his medical team saying it would probably, "Turn cancerous and kill him". He checked out and flew to Perth to begin The Copperwine experience. He was still using crutches at the time. The initial problem was not overcome until 1970 when Jeff was convinced to see Mr. John Hanrahan. Jeff says "To him I owe my life" who had just brought, from America, the almost miraculous "Rotation Flap Technique" which revolutionised the treatment of major pressure areas.

Undeterred by this, after a lengthy recovery period, Jeff became focused, and returned to live performance. Eventually Jeff started using a wheelchair and transformed his liability into his own trademark, executing 'wheelies' and pirouettes across the stage as he sang! Jeff says "With crutches, your hands are always full. The wheelchair allowed me to move around onstage and be self-
 sufficient".





In early 1969, Jeff unveiled his new band, Copperwine (aka Jeff St John's Copperwine), with low-key dates in Perth, before returning to Sydney. Copperwine soon created a following in that city's fast-developing 'head' scene. Around the time of the new band's formation, guitarist Ross East was also invited to join the revised Masters Apprentices line-up, but he turned it down, opting to stay with Jeff.

Aided by East and Peter Figures, plus Alan Ingham on bass and keyboardist Barry Kelly, Jeff St John wowed punters at the Ourimbah "Pilgrimage For Pop", Australia's first major outdoor rock festival, held at Ourimbah, NSW at the end of January 1970. The band's dynamic repertoire mixed quality prog-flavoured group originals with powerful renditions of Sly & the Family Stone's funk classic "Sing A Simple Song", a storming version of The Temptations' psych-soul masterpiece "Cloud Nine" and Blind Faith's "Can't Find My Way Home". This body of songs was captured by producer Spencer Lee in superb that remains one of the most accomplished and musically adventurous LPs of the time.


 The album entitled "Joint Effort" won considerable critical acclaim, but failed to generate significant sales. The single "Cloud Nine" suffered a similar fate in February 1970. An EP, Sing A Simple Song, which featured 4 songs from the album, was released in May 1970. Joint Effort as an album was one of Festival Record's most consistent sellers for many years, it's a fine example of what was musically going on with Australian rock in this fertile time, and it documents what a fine band Copperwine was and provided conclusive proof that Jeff St. John is one of the best rock vocalists this country has ever produced.

Another single, released in November 1970, fared extremely well. The smoothly confident, organ-led cover of Rotary Connection's "Teach Me How To Fly" propelled the band to number 12 on the Melbourne charts and a very encouraging number 3 in Sydney. Jeff's dazzling vocal performance on this record is probably the main reason why. The band toured relentlessly during 1971 and appeared with the Melbourne Symphony Orchestra. They also released another single, the delicate "Hummingbird".


 By late 1971 friction had emerged between Jeff St. John and Copperwine. He left them early in 1972 to form his own band and pursue a solo career. Seeking what he saw as a more sympathetic vehicle for his singing and songwriting, Jeff formed a touring outfit, The Jeff St John Band, featuring favoured sticksman Peter Figures, and the keyboard talents of the late, great Tony Ansell.


 In October 1972, Jeff released his first solo single, "Yesterday's Music". Jeff and band toured extensively during 1972, supporting acts as diverse as Gary Glitter, Chuck Berry and Bo Diddley. Along with the release of "The Best Of Jeff St John", Jeff was awarded the accolade of 'Most Outstanding Vocalist of the Year'.

Following a very successful year, Jeff St. John packed up and moved to the United Kingdom, so he could find out how the big kids played over there.

His farewell concert was a gala event staged at the Sydney Opera House, with the Jeff St John Band with the help of friends including Vince Melouney, John A. Bird and Ace Follington. In May 1974, an album of the concert was released, "Jeff St John Live", while Jeff was playing a handful of low-key gigs in London. 

 He returned to Australia in August 1974, to plan his next move.

On Jeff's return to Australia, he formed a new backing band, Red Cloud, and his new single "Mr Jones" was released in May 1975. Unfortunately the single was a minor sales success. It was followed up with "Blood Brother" in October. Jeff and Red Cloud maintained a heavy touring schedule during 1975-76, and the singer continued as a popular live draw.

Jeff was the first Australian artist to sign with US imprint Asylum (whose roster included The Eagles, Jackson Browne and Linda Ronstadt) and he made a return to the national Top 10 during early 1977 with his scorching version of the Frankie Miller-Andy Fraser song "Fool In Love". Jeff continued to record and perform live through the late 70s and into the early 80s, producing some quality rock performances, but in 1983, at the age of 37, he announced his retirement.

He made a memorable farewell appearance on Donnie Sutherland's late night chat show, After Dark, which made it clear that he was having problems at the time. Following this, Jeff stepped away from the limelight.

 In 1984, with the assistance of Dr. John Yeo (Director, Royal North Shore Spinal Unit), Jeff began lecturing to age groups from year 5 primary school to adult. He assisted with the creation of teaching aids, and production supervision of radio and T.V. advertising campaigns for the teaching program.

In the late 1990s Jeff moved to Perth in Western Australia, and in 1999 an old friend, drummer Ace Follington coaxed Jeff up onstage at Clancy's Fish Pub, Fremantle.

Jeff relished the chance to wield a mic again. He says "I'd been divorced from singing for so long, I'd lost sight of the fun involved".

That one-off performance led to a regular solo spot at Clancy's, the creation of an all-star backing group, Jeffrey St John & The Embers, a brand new, album titled Will The Real Jeff St John Please Stand Up? was released in 2001. On the album, Jeff has delved into the music of the '30s and '40s, performing swing standards with a rock treatment

He snickers "... instead of having big brass section solos on "Misty" and "Fascinatin' Rhythm", we've got over-driven and distorted guitar solos”.

 In 2000, he had the highest accolade of his career. when Promoter Michael Chugg, invited Jeff to perform the first two songs at the opening ceremony of the 2000 Paralympic Games in Sydney. Jeff says "BEST PARALYMPICS EVER - I love my country. It's allowed me to be crazy for more years than I can remember. To get up in front of 110,000 people live, with a TV audience of four billion, was a big honour".

Most recently, Jeff St. John was made Patron for the Mosaic Family & Community Services Organisation. This recently formed organisation provides support for disabled people in many areas, including rehabilitation programs for disabled people unfairly penalised by the legal system.






In 2016, Jeff released his auto-biography "INSIDER-OUTSIDER: The Jeff St John Story". The book is available from Starman Books.

Sunday, 22 October 2017

Martin Plaza - 1986 - Plaza Suite FLAC


Pit Stop/I Could Be So Good/Concrete And Clay/Out The Door/Best Foot Forward/Miss You Like Mad/Chalk And Cheese/Use Me All Over/Rollerina/Bats And Balls


Martin Plaza is the pseudonym of Martin Edward Murphy (born 1 January 1956), who is a vocalist/guitarist/songwriter with Australian pop/new wave band Mental As Anything. Plaza also has a solo music career and in 1986 had a No. 2 hit in Australia with his cover of the 1960s Unit 4+2 song "Concrete and Clay". Plaza has worked in other bands and is an accomplished artist.

Best known as the most familiar vocalist/songwriter in Mental as Anything (that's Martin Plaza you hear singing on "If You Leave Me, Can I Come Too?," "Rock and Roll Music," "Brain Brain," and many others), Plaza took advantage of the first real break in the Mentals' career and released his debut solo album in 1986. Plaza Suite was not a departure from what the Mentals were doing on their previous album, Fundamental as Anything, although the production was slicker and keyboard-dominated (Plaza is a guitarist). To be honest, most tracks here could have been on Mentals albums, but that's neither here nor there.

 
With a batch of great songs, Plaza sounds confident and self-assured on this album, never letting the album's slick sound take over. His voice is still one of the best in the business, a perfect mixture of Roy Orbison, Elvis Presley, and Bryan Ferry. The album is mostly self-penned, and his brilliant cover of "Concrete and Clay" fits in with the originals perfectly (as of 2003, he was still performing this song with the Mentals live). Sounding like the poppier side of Rockpile, Plaza and the Mentals have always specialized in great songwriting, and almost every track here is no exception to that rule. The opener, "Pit Stop," contains all the elements of the perfect Plaza song: playful yet heartfelt vocals, a hooky melody, and an earthiness beneath the shiny surface. Other highlights include the perfect pop of "Miss You Like Mad" and "Use Me All Over," the funky "I Could Be So Good," and the joyous "Best Foot Forward."

Friday, 20 October 2017

Brian Cadd - 1972 - Brian Cadd (Vinyl) FLAC


Fairweather Friend/Tell The World To Go Away/Where The Music Is Playing/Josie McGinty/Tell Me About Freedom Again/Ginger Man/Pappy's Got The Blues/Silver City Birthday Celebration Day/Suite For Life


Born in Perth, Western Australia, Brian moved to Melbourne just as the Beatles phenomenon hit Australia.

He joined "THE GROOP" in 1966 and wrote all of their many hit singles and albums including WOMAN YOU’RE BREAKING ME and SUCH A LOVELY WAY.


 
                             The Groop Max Ross, Richard Wright,Ronnie Charles, Brian Cadd and Don Mudie


Upon their demise, he formed "AXIOM", Australia's first "Supergroup" with Glenn Shorrock who was later the lead singer of THE LITTLE RIVER BAND. He once again penned all of Axiom's hits before the band broke up in England in 1969. These include LITTLE RAY OF SUNSHINE, ARKANSAS GRASS and MY BABY’S GONE.
 
Returning to Australia he joined Fable Records as head of A&R and chief producer. Fable launched a rock label called Bootleg Records in 1972 and Brian ran the label as well as being its first artist. The label became the most successful Independent record company in the history of Australian popular music up to that time. The next few years saw many gold and platinum records as a solo artist and an array of prestigious awards for film scores, title songs and TV themes. In addition he produced many acts and wrote and produced some of Australia's most successful advertising music. Hits from this era include: GINGER MAN, LET GO, DON’T YOU KNOW IT’S MAGIC, ALVIN PURPLE, CLASS OF 74 and MAMMA DON’T DANCE.


 Axiom Don Mudie, Don Lebler, Glenn Shorrock, Brian Cadd and Chris Stockley

 In 1976 he was signed to CAPITOL RECORDS as an artist and moved to Los Angeles. For the next 20 years he worked in all aspects of the International music scene from writing, production, publishing, management and the planning, development and administration of several successful music production companies. Additionally he created FAIRYDUST MUSIC, a worldwide publishing company now owning in excess of 300 song copyrights.
 
In 1989 Cadd relocated to Nashville where he built the SALAD BOWL STUDIO facility and owned and operated several successful music production companies. For 7 years he participated in the enormous explosion of country music onto the national and then international music scene.

During this period he also wrote for, produced and ultimately joined the legendary FLYING BURRITO BROTHERS alongside original members ‘Sneaky Pete Kleinow’ and Chris Etheridge. The band released an album ‘Eye of a Hurricane’ and toured the U.S. and Europe extensively over the next several years.
 
Brian Cadd moved back to Australia permanently in 1997 after 25 years working in the International music industry in both the U.S. and Europe. A part of the enormously successful tour LONG WAY TO THE TOP in 2004, he has continued to tour Australia due to the huge ‘Boomers’ audience out there, still rocking. 

In July 2007, he was inducted into the ARIA Hall of Fame. In the same year he was inducted into the Australian Songwriters Hall of Fame.
 
Apart from his Australian touring, writing and production, Brian also spends several months a year travelling the world writing and recording, particularly in Nashville and throughout Europe.
 
As a writer, Brian has provided songs for an amazing string of artists both in Australia and internationally including: Joe Cocker, Ringo Starr, The Pointer Sisters, Bonnie Tyler, Yvonne Elliman, Little River Band, Charlie Daniels, Glen Campbell, Flying Burrito Brothers, Dobie Gray, Gene Pitney, Johnnny Halliday, Sylvie Vartan, Cilla Black, Trini Lopez, Russell Morris, John Farnham, Gina Jeffries, The Groop, Axiom, The Masters Apprentices and many more.

Monday, 9 October 2017

Dinah Lee - 1996 - Dinah Lee - 1964-67 FLAC


Don't You Know Yockomo/Reet Petite/Do The Blue Beat/Who Stole The Sugar/The Nitty Gritty/Hey Chickie Baby/I'll Forgive You, Then Forget You/What Did He Say/What Kind Of Love Is This/ Is It True/Hot Spot/Pushing A Good Thing Too Far/That's It, I Quit/I Can't Believe What You Say/Let Me In/Johnny/Don't You Just Know It/He Don't Want Your Love/The Right Time/Not In This Whole World/ Summertime/He's Sure The Boy I Love/New Orleans/98.6/Too Many People/ I Keep Forgettin'







 Diane Marie Jacobs (born 19 August 1943, Waimate), known as Dinah Lee, is a New Zealand-born singer who performed 1960s pop and then adult contemporary music. Her debut single from early 1964, "Don't You Know Yockomo?", achieved No. 1 chart success in New Zealand and in the Australian cities, Brisbane and Melbourne. It was followed in September by her cover version of Jackie Wilson's, "Reet Petite", which also reached No. 1 in New Zealand and peaked at No. 6 in Melbourne. The Australian release was a double A-sided single with "Do the Blue Beat". On her early singles she was backed by fellow New Zealanders, Max Merritt & His Meteors. Lee appeared regularly on both New Zealand and Australian TV variety programs, including Sing, Sing, Sing and Bandstand. She toured supporting Johnny O'Keefe, Ray Columbus & the Invaders and P.J. Proby. According to Australian rock music journalist, Ed Nimmervoll, in the 1960s, "Lee was the most successful female singer of in both her New Zealand homeland and Australia ... on stage and on record Dinah had all the adventure and exuberance for the time the boys had".


 Dinah Lee was born as Diane Marie Jacobs on 19 August 1943 in Waimate, South Island, New Zealand. After her parents separated, she was fostered by a family near Christchurch where she attended Cashmere High School. Her father was a saxophonist, who worked selling carpets in a Christchurch department store and, part-time, ran a teen dance club – The Country Club Cabaret. In 1958, Lee was asked to sing at the club on Saturdays and became popular with local patrons. As a 15-year-old, she had her first professional gig with Bobby Davis & the Dazzlers in a small hall and they later worked in a coffee lounge. In 1962, Lee was working with Christchurch group, Saints, and dating their guitarist and vocalist, Phil Garland. By year's end Saints had split and Lee and Garland formed The Playboys with Mark Graham on guitar, Brian Ringrose (ex-Ray Columbus & the Invaders) on guitar, Dave Martin on guitar and Graeme Miller on drums. They relocated to Auckland for a residency at Top 20 Club, Lee shared lead vocals with Garland, one of her covers was Huey "Piano" Smith's "Don't You Know Yockomo?" popularised by American R&B artist Dee Dee Sharp. Playboys returned to Christchurch, but by 1963, Lee returned to Auckland to pursue her solo career, she supported gigs by Max Merritt & His Meteors or Ray Columbus & the Invaders. Playboys recruited Graeme's brother Dave on vocals and later became The Dave Miller Set in Sydney.

Lee adopted the latest Mod fashions following advice from boutique owner, Jackie Holme – a page boy haircut, white make-up, op-art clothes and white boots. After being recommended by Merritt, she joined the Startime Spectacular Tour of North Island which was headlined by Bill & Boyd and Max Merritt & His Meteors – Merritt's band backed her during her set. Her performances were more animated and energetic than typically demure female pop artists. Lee was heckled at some regional venues and her mother was unable to recognise her when catching up at an airport. Tour organiser, James Haddleton, became her manager and she was signed with Viking Records, an independent label based in Wellington and she was promoted as 'Queen of the Mods'.


Dinah Lee's debut single, "Don't You Know Yockomo?", was released in August 1964 – under the name Diane Lee, chosen by Viking – and peaked at No. 1 in New Zealand. Viking used Merritt's band to back her in the studio and after the first pressings had sold out, Viking changed the attribution to Dinah Lee. Ray Columbus & the Invaders' single, "She's a Mod" became the first by a New Zealand act to reach No. 1 on an Australian chart. Only weeks later, Lee's single, "Don't You Know Yockomo?" was issued there by EMI on their HMV label and reached No. 1 in Brisbane and Melbourne.

Lee's second single, "Reet Petite" was a cover of Jackie Wilson's hit and had also been recorded with Merritt's band, when released in September it reached No. 1 in New Zealand. Her third single, Ray Rivera's "Do the Blue Beat", followed in October in New Zealand. "Reet Petitie" and "Do the Blue Beat" were issued as a double A-sided single in Australia and reached No. 3 in Adelaide and No. 6 in Melbourne. Lee toured New Zealand and Australia on Starlift '64, promoted by Harry M. Miller, with a bill headed by The Searchers, Peter and Gordon and Del Shannon. Backing Lee at some gigs were Ray Columbus & the Invaders and, in Sydney, a newly formed group – The Easybeats. With "Reet Petite" charting in Australia, rock'n'roller Johnny O'Keefe invited Lee to appear on his television series, Sing, Sing, Sing and join his Sydney club shows.

 Upon return to Auckland, Lee issued her fourth Viking single, "Who Stole the Sugar?" in November. She featured on two half-hour specials on New Zealand TV, while "I'm Walking" was issued as her next Australian single by HMV. By year's end, Viking had also released two extended plays, Don't You Know... and Yeah, Yeah We Love Them All and her debut album, Introducing Dinah Lee.

In early 1965, Lee appeared on Australian TV shows, Bandstand and Saturday Date. One of her Bandstand performances was at Myer Music Bowl with headlining Jamaican Blue beat singer Millie Small.  Lee travelled to the United States to appear on Shindig! – she sang with Glen Campbell – and on other TV shows. Lee then went to the United Kingdom where she released, "I'll Forgive You Then Forget You" on Island Records' label Aladdin. In August–September, Lee toured New Zealand and Australia with US pop sensation, P.J. Proby – noted for splitting his pants on stage in the UK in February – who had been banned by the BBC. In Australia, HMV released "Let Me In" to coincide with the tour. Lee won 'Entertainer of the Year' at New Zealand's inaugural NEBOA Awards in late September – soon after she decided to base herself in Australia. Late in the year, Viking released a string of singles, "He Can't Do the Blue Beat", "Nitty Gritty" and "That's it I Quit", in New Zealand. In November, they released her second studio album, The Sound of Dinah Lee.

 Late in 1965, Dinah Lee relocated to Sydney and in March 1966 she undertook a second tour with Small. Lee's next single was "He Don't Want Your Love Anymore" but her chart success had begun to decline. On 29 June 1966, Australian teen newspaper, Go-Set published "The Dinah Lee Story" and she appeared on their front cover. Her public popularity was still high – she was voted No. 2 'Female Vocal' in Go-Set's pop poll in October and was in the top 5 for 1967 and 1968. Lee continued to release singles in 1966, she toured with Proby in September–October and followed with a third studio album, The Mod World of Dinah Lee late that year. In April 1967, she became the 'face' for Yardley Cosmetics' commercials on Australian TV. Her July single for Viking and HMV was "Sorry Mama" but neither company renewed her contract.

Lee spent most of the late 1960s on the night club circuit with occasional variety TV appearances. Lee successfully sued her former manager, Haddleton, for money owed and re-took control of her financial interests. According to Australia rock music journalist, Ed Nimmervoll, in the 1960s, "Lee was the most successful female singer of in  both her New Zealand homeland and Australia ... on stage and on record Dinah had all the adventure and exuberance for the time the boys had." Lee entertained troops in Vietnam in the late 1960s on Australian Broadcasting Commission-sponsored tours (under her birth name, Diane Jacobs) and was awarded the Vietnam Logistic and Support Medal.

In the 1970s, she continued to release singles including "Tell Him" in 1972 on Polydor. In 1974, she joined O'Keefe on his comeback show, The Good Old Days of Rock'n'Roll, at St. George's Leagues Club. Her next single, "It Doesn't Matter Anymore" appeared in 1976 on Festival Records. "I Can See Clearly Now" was released in 1979 on Laser Records.

In 1982, a compilation, Best of Dinah Lee was issued on Music World. By 1984, she had become involved in body building winning the 'Australian Female Body Builder of the Year' in the over 35s category. In the 1990s and 2000s, Lee continued performing on the club circuit and became a motivational speaker.

ABC-TV series, Long Way to the Top, was broadcast in August 2001. Lee featured on "Episode 2: Ten Pound Rocker 1963–1968" where she discussed the mod look and her appeal to rebellious teens, "I had this image and it wasn't cute and pretty". The TV series inspired the Long Way to the Top national concert tour during August–September 2002, which featured a host of the best Australian acts of the 1950s, 1960s and 1970s. Lee's performances of "Yokomo"  and "Reet Petite" at the final Sydney concert, as well as an interview with promoter, Michael Chugg, feature on the associated DVD, Long Way to the Top: Live in Concert released in 2002.

Pseud0 Ech0 - 1985 - L0ve @n @dventure FLAC


Love An Adventure/Don't Go/Try/I Will Be You/Girl/Living In A Dream/I Ask You Why/Lonely Without You/Lies Are Nothing/Lies Are Nothing



 Pseudo Echo are an Australian new wave band that formed in 1982 in Melbourne. The original line-up consisted of Brian Canham (vocals, guitars and keyboards), born 3 July 1962, Pierre Gigliotti (as Pierre Pierre) (bass guitar, keyboards), Tony Lugton (guitars and keyboards) and Anthony Argiro (drums). A later line-up included James Leigh (keyboards) and his brother, Vince Leigh (drums). In the 1980s, Pseudo Echo had Australian top 20 hits with "Listening", "A Beat for You", "Don't Go", "Love an Adventure", "Living in a Dream" and their cover of "Funky Town" (from Lipps Inc.), which peaked at No. 1 in 1986. In 1987, it reached No. 1 in Canada and New Zealand, No. 6 in United States and No. 8 in United Kingdom.


They released their debut album, Autumnal Park in 1984 which peaked at No. 11 on the Australian Kent Music Report. Love an Adventure followed in 1985 and reached No. 14. Their third album, Race (1988) peaked at No. 18 and in 1990 the group disbanded. They reformed in 1998 and issued Teleporter in 2000. Rock music historian Ian McFarlane, stated they "combined flash clothes, blow-wave hairstyles, youthful exuberance and accessible synth-pop to arrive at a winning combination ... and found a ready-made audience among teenagers who fawned on the band's every move".

Love An Adventure is the second studio album by Australian new wave band, Pseudo Echo. The album peaked at No. 14 in Australia and produced three Australian top twenty singles, including "Don’t Go", which peaked at No. 4.

In 1987, an alternate version of the album featuring re-recorded vocals and several different tracks, including their 1986 worldwide hit cover of "Funkytown," was released in North America by RCA Records. 

Following the success of Autumnal Park, Pseudo Echo returned to the studio in 1985, with an altered line up. Tony Lugton and Anthony Argiro both left and joined other bands. They were replaced by brothers James Leigh and Vince Leigh (aka Vincent Dingli).
Reviews

Michael Sutton from allmusic gave the album 4 out of 5 stars, saying: Their cover of Lipps Inc.'s ‘’Funkytown’’ was sadly misrepresentative of the album's stylish, hook-loaded dance rock. Pseudo Echo want people to move their feet and this album is stocked with dance floor scorchers such as "Living in a Dream", "Listening" and the funky "Try". "Funkytown" may have given Pseudo Echo a glimpse of commercial success, but the rest of 'Love an Adventure' proved that they were capable of more.

Sunday, 8 October 2017

0l' 55 - 1976 - Take !t Gre@sy FLAC


A1 Summertime Summertime (Intro)    
A2 Irridescent Pink Sock Blues    
A3 I Wonder Why    
A4 Almost Grown    
A5 Think It Over    
A6 Get A Job    
A7 Doin Fine    
A8 Only Sixteen    
B1 This Little Girl    
B2 On The Prowl    
B3 New Girl In School    
B4 Skateboard Thrills    
B5 Looking For An Echo    
B6 Goodnight Sweetheart    
B7 School Days (Outro)



 Take It Greasy was the debut studio album to be released by Australian 1950's retro band Ol' 55. The album peaked at number 3 on the Australian Kent Music Report and was certified 3x platinum. At the time, 1950s music and culture had gained a newfound interest in Australia amongst a younger generation, largely due to the influence of the very popular TV show Happy Days and earlier investigations into doo-wop by the group Daddy Cool.

 Ol' 55 was an Australian band specialising in retro, 1950s-era Rock 'n' Roll. They formed as Fanis in 1972 in Sutherland, Sydney. Drummer Geoff Plummer was working with Glenn A. Baker at the NSW Department of Media and invited Baker to hear his part-time band, including Patrick "Meatballs" Drummond, Rockpile Jones and Jimmy Manzie. In 1975, Baker took on their management, renamed them as Ol' 55 for the Tom Waits song (as covered by The Eagles), and recruited front man Frankie J. Holden and, later in the year, saxophonist Wilbur Wilde.

The band enjoyed popularity with a style that bordered on parody but managed to combine novelty retro kitsch and clever theatrics with a keen sense of pop dynamics and an acute understanding of rock 'n' roll. The band scored five top 20 hits on the Australian Kent Music Report singles chart and their debut album, Take It Greasy peaked at No. 3 on the Australian albums chart in 1976. After line-up changes, Ol' 55 disbanded in 1983.

Saturday, 7 October 2017

@yers R0ck - 1976 - Bey0nd FLAC


Moondah/A Place To Go/Catchanemu/Song For Darwin/Angel In Disguise/Little Kings




Ayers Rock was the leading Australian 'jazz-rock' group of the 70s, fusing rock with influences from soul, R&B, jazz and Latin music. The band was built on world-class standards of playing and complex arrangements, and inspired by overseas groups such as Traffic, Santana and Weather Report. The original members were all seasoned players, widely regarded as among the best musos in the country, and their musical connections were woven through a series of major bands of the 60s and early 70s.

Mark Kennedy was and is still widely regarded as one of Australia's best drummers. He rose to prominence as the original drummer in Spectrum. He left that band in late 1970, just after recording their first LP, and he became an in-demand session player, as well as working in a series of loosely connected groups including King Harvest (where he first teamed up with McGuire and Doyle) and Friends with Leo De Castro.


Left: the original lineup of Ayers Rock (1973). Clockwise from left: Duncan Maguire, Mark Kennedy, Jim Doyle, Ray Burton (seated)



Duncan McGuire was a true rock veteran (and one of the unsung heroes of Aussie music). His first band was The Phantoms way back in 1959. He was a member of The Epics (1962-64), who backed Little Pattie live and on her early Singles and first album, as well as playing with Reg Lindsay, Johnny Ashcroft, Brian Davies, Jay Justin and Johnny O'Keefe. From 1966-68 he was a member of The Questions (Doug Parkinson's first major band) which also included Ray Burton and Doug Lavery (who later joined The Valentines and Axiom). McGuire stayed with Parkinson through In Focus and Fanny Adams before shifting to Melbourne and playing with King Harvest and Friends.

Jimmy Doyle had been a member of the backing bands for The Delltones and Dig Richards, and during the early Sixties he also worked as the musical director for renowned honky-tonk pianist Winifred Atwell.

Ray Burton had been the rhythm guitarist in the Dave Bridge Quartet in the early Sixties, and then a member of the Delltones' backing band, after which he joined the first lineup of successful Sydney harmony-pop group The Executives. He worked variously with Doyle, McGuire and Kennedy in King Harvest, Doug Parkinson In Focus and Friends. He relocated to the USA in the early 70s, where he worked with Helen Reddy and co-wrote her 1972 international mega-hit "I Am Woman".

In 1973 the above-named four took the logical step and formed their own band, McGuire Kennedy Burton. Later in the year, they added another player, multi-intrumentalist Col Loughnan. Col had actually started his career as lead singer with Sydney vocal group The Crescents. In 1962 Col was recruited to replace Noel Widerberg, lead singer with The Delltones, who had been tragically killed in a car accident earlier in the year. Col performed with The Delltones for five years (1962-67). In the late Sixties Col returned to his first love, jazz, and his prowess on a wide range of instruments (alto, tenor and baritione saxophones, flute, keyboards and percussion) gave the Ayers Rock sound a distinctive edge.

With Loughnan on board, the new band changed their name to the more marketable (and patriotic) Ayers Rock. They were one of the first groups signed to Michael Gudinski's newly established Mushroom label, and their debut single, "Rock'n'Roll Fight", was issued at the end of 1973.

They performed at Sunbury '74 and one track from their set, Ray Burton's "Morning Magic", was included on the Highlights of Sunbury 1974 LP, which has recently been re-released in the 2-CD set Highlights of Sunbury 1973 and 1974 on Michael Gudinski's Liberation Blue label. These tracks are the only extant Ayers Rock recordings to feature Burton, who left the band during 1974. Col Loughnan's official website features a superb colour clip of the group performing live at Sunbury, with excellent sound.






                 Jimmy Doyle,Duncan McGuire,Col Loughnan,Chris Brown and Mark Kennedy

He was replaced by singer-guitarist Chris Brown, whose previous credits included a stint in Little Sammy & The In People, the noted '60s Sydney club outfit led by singer Sam "Little Sammy" Gaha (father of TV's Eden and Danielle Gaha); although not commercially successful, this notable band variously included Brown, Harry Brus, Michael Carlos, Barrie McAskill, Col Nolan and Janice Slater.

Ayers Rock's debut album Big Red Rock was taped live before an invited audience at Armstrong's Studios in Melbourne over two nights in September 1974. The live-in-the-studio approach worked extremely well for Ayers Rock, and the album clearly demonstrated why their awesome live 'chops' had made them such a popular concert attraction. But it also was something of a necessity for the cash-strapped label -- they took the same approach with andnother early signing, Mackenzie Theory. The Ayers Rock LP reportedly cost Mushroom a mere $5000 to record.


 Big Red Rock was an early critical and commerical success for Mushroom, showcasing the band's considerable prowess and the material was a good balance between the more commercial song-based material of McGuire and Brown and the more adventurous instrumentals. The LP features three songs by McGuire, including their memorable second single, the Latin-flavoured "Lady Montego", a song that dated back to McGuire's stint in Friends; an earlier, slower version appears (in a live recording) on the Garrison: The Final Blow LP.

Big Red Rock also features two excellent pieces by Loughnan, two songs by Chris Brown, and a dazzling cover of Joe Zawinul's "Boogie Woogie Waltz", originally recorded by Weather Report (who were at that time virtually unknown in Australia). Loughnan's power-jam "Crazy Boys" is also worth hearing for its hilarious intro; dedicated to an unnamed Sydney hamburger joint, it includes a sly reference to a "Gudinski burger" and very funny joke about "Dr Hopontopovus, the Greek gynaecologist".

As Vernon Joyson has noted, Ayers Rock's recordings suggest that there was some dilemma about whether they should pursue a more expansive instrumental-based approach or opt for a more song-based commercial sound. From the evidence of Big Red Rock, its arguable that its the instrumental tracks -- "Crazy Boys", "Big Red Rock" and the brilliant cover of "Boogie Woogie Waltz -- that stand up best today, but the demands of radio airplay and gigging meant that this dilemma was never satifactorily resolved, and the group's relatively short lifespan and small catalogue meant that they never really got the chance to reach their full potential.



                                                  Playing at the Concert For Bangladesh

In the late 1975 Ayers Rock performed at the final gigs at Melbourne's fabled Reefer Cabaret. Live versions of the Stones' "Gimme Shelter" and "Boogie Woogie Waltz" were included on the double-album A-Reefer-Derci, culled from performances from the last two nights on 30 and 31 December 1975, and released by Mushroom in 1976. Like Mushroom's earlier Garrison: The Final Blow set, it commemorated the closure of the venue and was a means of thanking the Reefer Cabaret for supporting Mushroom's artists during 1974-75.

During '75-76, Kennedy began working with Marcia Hines and they later became engaged, which led to him leaving Ayers Rock in 1976. He was replaced for a time by Russell Dunlop, who, like Kennedy, was a seasoned veteran, and a respected session player and producer, but his permanent replacement was hotshot young drummer Hamish Stuart, who has since become a mainstay of the Sydney music scene and one of the most respected drummers in the country. At this point the group also added a permanent keyboard player, Andy Cowan (ex Madder Lake).

Ayers Rock's second LP Beyond was not quite as successful sales-wise, but no less impressiv musically. By this time the emphasis had shifted to longer works that allowed the band to showcase its considerable improvisational skills, and the LP consists of just six tracks, three each by Col Loughnan and Chris Brown. One of Brown's songs, "Little Kings", was lifted to become their third single.

 Duncan McGuire (left) and Chris Brown at the Record Plant, L.A. in September 1975.


Recorded in Los Angeles, the album was vastly more expensive to record than its predecessor, reportedly costing Mushroom a whacking $60,000, but by this time Mushroom's coffers had been swelled by the massive success of Skyhooks. The LP was also released in the USA, with different cover art. Their fourth and final single for Mushroom, "Song For Darwin" (May 1976) was inspired by the Cyclone Tracy disaster that had devastated the city on Christmas Day 1975.

After parting with Mushroom, the band broke up for about three years, but it was reformed by Brown, Doyle, Stuart and Cowan in 1979 and they established their own label, Red Rock. A new single, "On The Avenue" was released at the end of 1979, followed by "Lies" in early 1980, both issued through Polydor. The singles were both included on their third and final LP Hotspell, distributed by RCA. Unfortunately, the album was not successful and the band broke up in 1981.



Founding members Jimmy Doyle and Duncan McGuire have, sadly, both since passed away; Duncan died in 1986 from a brain tumour and Jimmy died in May 2006 from liver cancer.

On a happier note, we are pleased to report that Mark Kennedy, Col Loughnan and Ray Burton are all still going strong. Ray has his own website, faeturing great information and images of his career, past and present. Col has recently released a new CD, Ellen St, and his earlier collaboration with guitarist Steve Murphy, entitled Feel The Breeze, is also highly recommended. Both are available from Col's website, which is listed below.



M0nd0 R0ck - 1984 - The M0dern B0p FLAC


Lovers Of The World/Come Said The Boy/Happy Families/The Modern Bop/Take Me Away/Baby Wants To Rock/Flight 28/Marina/Cost Of Living/In My House


The Modern Bop is the fourth studio album by Australian rock band Mondo Rock, released in March 1984 and peaked at number 5 on the Kent Music Report.



 Mondo Rock was an Australian rock band formed in November 1976 by mainstay singer-songwriter, Ross Wilson (ex-Daddy Cool). They're best known for their second album, Chemistry which was released in July 1981 and peaked at number 2 on the Australian Kent Music Report. Their song "Come Said the Boy" peaked at number 2 in Australia in 1984. The group disbanded in 1991, although they have periodically undertaken reunion concerts. According to Australian musicologist, Ian McFarlane, "by way of ceaseless touring and the release of a series of sophisticated pop rock albums, the band was one of the most popular acts in Australia during the early 1980s".

Mondo Rock were formed in November 1976 in Melbourne by Bob Bickerton on drums (ex-Rock Granite and the Profiles); Mike Clarke on bass guitar (ex-Mick Rogers and Eclipse); Greg Cook on keyboards and guitar (ex-Cam-Pact, Skylight, Phil Manning Band); Peter Laffy on guitar (ex-Fox, Freeway); and Ross Wilson (ex-Daddy Cool) on lead vocals and harmonica.

In September 1978, Mondo Rock released their debut single, "The Fugitive Kind", on Oz Records which peaked at number 49 on the Australian Kent Music Report. In October 1979 the line-up of Wilson, Gyllies, Bulpin, Laffy and McLennan recorded their debut album, Primal Park, which was issued on the Avenue label via EMI Records and peaked at number 40 in Australia. The album yielded two singles, "Searching for My Baby" (September) and "Primal Park" (November). McLennan contracted hepatitis as the band was due to tour to promote the album, so he was replaced, first by Eddie Van Roosendael (ex-Stiletto), and then by Gil Matthews (ex-Billy Thorpe & the Aztecs) on drums, for the tour.

 In February 1980, a new version of Mondo Rock of Wilson, Matthews and James Black (ex-Rum Jungle, Russell Morris Band) on keyboards and guitar; Paul Christie (ex-Kevin Borich Express) on bass guitar; and Eric McCusker (ex-The Captain Matchbox Whoopee Band) on guitar was established.

This line-up released their first major hit single, "State of the Heart" in October 1980, which peaked at number 6 on the Kent Music Report. The track was written by McCusker, who contributed many songs to the band's repertoire, taking some of the pressure off Wilson, who was experiencing temporary writer's block. Matthews left after the single appeared and was replaced by Andy Buchanan (ex-Darryl Cotton Band) and then by John James "J. J." Hackett (ex-Stars, the Fabulaires) in March 1981. Their next single, "Cool World", appeared in April 1981 and was also successful on the chart, reaching No. 8.

The band's second album, Chemistry was released in July 1981 and peaked at number 2 on the Kent Music Report. Two more singles were released from the album with "Chemistry" peaking at number 20 and "Summer of '81" at 31. The royalties from "Summer of '81" single were donated to Amnesty International.





In June 1982, Mondo Rock released "No Time", the lead single from the bands third studio album. According to Mccosker, "No Time" was inspired by The Beatles' "Don't Let Me Down", as a tribute to John Lennon. The song peaked at number 11 in Australia. In July 1982 the band released its third studio album Nuovo Mondo, on RCA / WEA, which peaked at number 7 in Australia. Christie left the group in September and subsequently formed an all-star band, The Party Boys; he was replaced on bass guitar by James Gillard. Two additional singled were released, The Queen and Me" and "In Another Love". The album also includes "A Touch of Paradise" which was released in February 1987 by Australian pop singer John Farnham, as his third single from his album, Whispering Jack and reached the Australian top 30.

By 1983, the Mondo Rock line-up of Wilson, Black, Gillard, Hackett, and McCusker started recording their fourth studio album. In December, the album's lead single "Come Said the Boy" was released, which peaked at number 2 in Australia. The song is a provocative tale about the loss of virginity and was banned by many radio stations including Sydney's then top-rated 2SM – which was affiliated with the Roman Catholic Church. The Modern Bop was released in March 1984 and peaked number 5 in Australia. The album yielded two more singles, "Baby Wants to Rock" and "The Modern Bop".
 
 In June 1985 Polydor Records released the band's first compilation album Up to the Moment, which peaked at number 5.  The album produced two singles, "Good Advice" and "The Moment". On 13 July 1985 Mondo Rock performed four tracks for the Oz for Africa concert (part of the global Live Aid program). The concert was broadcast in Australia (on both Seven Network and Nine Network) and on MTV in the US.

Mondo Rock: (l-r) James Black, Ross Wilson, Gil Matthews, Eric McCusker, Paul Christie 2015

The group's sixth studio album, Boom Baby Boom was released in September 1986 with the line-up of Wilson, Gillard, Hackett, and McCusker, joined by Andrew Ross on saxophone and Duncan Veall on keyboards. The album peaked at number 27 in Australia. The album's second single "Primitive Love Rites" was released in October 1986 and peaked in the top 40 in Australia and in 1987, became a minor hit on the US Billboard Hot 100 and reached the top 40 on its Mainstream Rock chart. In November 1987, the band released an extended play titled, Aliens. Wilson disbanded the group early the following year and recorded a solo album, The Dark Side of the Man, which included a top 40 single, "Bed of Nails", in June 1989.

In 1990 Mondo Rock reconvened and recorded the group's sixth studio album, Why Fight It?, which was issued in November 1990. Three singles were released from the album, "Why Fight It?", "I Had You in Mind" and "Soul Reason". In 1991 Wilson dissolved the group again.

Thursday, 5 October 2017

Chr!st!ne @nu - 2005 - @coustically FLAC


01 'Coz I'm Free    
02 Monkey And The Turtle    
03 Dive    
04 Wanem Time    
05 Last To Go    
06 Reprise 1    
07 Fire And Water (Take Me Down)    
08 Island Home    
09 Party    
10 Reprise 2    
11 Ocean Of Regret    
12 Redemption Song    
13 Sunshine On A Rainy Day    
14 No Woman, No Cry





 Christine Anu (born 15 March 1970) is an Australian pop singer and actress. She gained popularity with the release of her song "My Island Home". Anu has been nominated for 17 ARIA Awards.
Anu began performing as a dancer and later went on to sing back-up vocals for The Rainmakers, which included Neil Murray of the Warumpi Band. Her first recording was in 1993 with "Last Train", a dance remake of a Paul Kelly song. The follow-up, "Monkey and the Turtle", was based on a traditional story. After "My Island Home", she released her first album, Stylin' Up which went Platinum. 

 In 1995, Neil Murray won an Australasian Performing Right Association songwriting award for writing "My Island Home". Christine Anu won an ARIA Award for best female recording artist as well as a Deadly Sounds National Aboriginal & Islander Music Awards Award in 1996 for best female artist.

Baz Luhrmann asked her to sing on the song "Now Until the Break of Day" on his Something for Everybody album. It was released as a single and the video then won another ARIA award and led to her being cast in Moulin Rouge!.

In January 1998, Anu teamed up with Archie Roach, Paul Kelly, Judith Durham, Renee Geyer, Kutcha Edwards and Tiddas and formed 'Singers for the Red Black and Gold'. Together, they released a cover of "Yil Lull"

In, 2000, Anu released Come My Way which peaked at number 18 on the ARIA albums chart and went gold. In 2000 she sang the song "My Island Home" at the Sydney 2000 Olympics Closing Ceremony.

 In November 2003, Anu released her third studio album, 45 Degrees. In 2007, Anu toured a children's show and released an associate album titled Chrissy's Island Family. The album gained an ARIA Award nomination. On 26 September 2010, she released a new digital only single, "Come Home". On 7 November 2014, Anu released a Christmas album, titled Island Christmas.


Anu has also had an acting plus TV career. She appeared in Dating the Enemy, a 1996 Australian film starring Guy Pearce and Claudia Karvan. She then appeared in an Australian production of the stage musical Little Shop of Horrors in the same year.

Anu's stage career developed with a starring role in the original Australian production of Rent in 1998 and 1999. Anu was offered a role in a Broadway production of this musical but had to decline due to commitments in recording her second album. Her links with Baz Luhrmann led to him offering her a part in Moulin Rouge!. In 2003, she appeared as Kali in The Matrix Reloaded and played the character on the video game Enter the Matrix.

 
In 2004, she became a judge on Popstars Live, a television quest broadcast on the Seven Network at 6.30 pm on Sunday night in Australia along the lines of Australian Idol. The program failed to achieve a similar level of success, leading network executives to pressure the judges to offer harsher criticism of the contestants. Christine Anu refused to offer harsher criticism, leading to her resignation as a judge in April 2004. In a statement issued on her departure, she said: "I chose to play a positive role model and wanted to encourage these young people in their endeavours, rather than criticise them. Although leaving Popstars Live was a difficult decision for me to make, I do feel somewhat relieved that I can now focus on my music."

In 2009 Anu participated in Who Do You Think You Are. She appeared again on television in 2012, in the Australian sci-fi television series Outland, about a gay sci-fi fan club. Anu plays wheelchair using Rae, the sole female member of the group.


 In 2016, Anu was appointed as host of Evenings 702 ABC Sydney, 1233 ABC Newcastle, 666 ABC Canberra, and ABC Local Radio stations across New South Wales. She took over from Dominic Knight who had hosted the program since 2012. In the first half of 2016 the program suffered a dip in the ratings after she began hosting.

In December 2016, it was announced that Christine will no longer host Evenings on 702 ABC Sydney, but will instead present a national Evenings program on Fridays and Saturdays in 2017. In January 2017, Chris Bath replaced Anu hosting Evenings from Monday to Thursday. Christine has a number of regular guests she speaks to about a range of topics.